13Sep/17

Piping PowerShell Output Into Bash

With Windows 10, you can install Bash on Windows. Cool, right? Having Bash on Windows goes a long way towards making Windows a more developer-friendly environment and opens a ton of doors. The one I’m going to show you today is more of a novelty than anything else, but maybe you’ll find something neat to do with it.

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30Aug/17

Get A ServiceNow User Using PowerShell

ServiceNow is a cloud computing company whose software is used for IT Service Management based on ITIL standards. They’ve got a bunch of different modules for managing problems and incidents, operations management, performance analytics, and more. You there some custom development you can do to modify their solutions or build your own. It’s pretty flexible, and we use it where I work.

I have been working with the ServiceNow API a lot lately. This week, I’m going to show you something pretty simple: Getting a ServiceNow user.

Let’s jump into some code first and I’ll break down what I’m doing.

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23Aug/17

Getting Started With Azure Automation (Pluralsight Course)

I try my best to make new technical posts on this blog every Wednesday morning. They vary in length, skill level, and sometimes even usefulness. Today I wanted to share that my first Pluralsight course was published last week: Getting Started with Azure Automation.

 

Pluralsight is a paid service but trials are available, and it’s a benefit of having an MSDN subscription. They’ve got thousands of hours of good stuff for people working in all areas of technology, including my new course.

 

My Getting Started with Azure Automation course will take you from zero knowledge to functionally useful in just over an hour. Please check it out and don’t hesitate to contact me with any questions or feedback.

 

As a Pluralsight author, I am compensated for creating courses so this is technically a sponsored post. I do, however, truly believe in their service overall, and think many people who read my blog may benefit from watching my course.

09Aug/17

Add A Column To A CSV Using PowerShell

Say you have a CSV file full of awesome, super great, amazing information. It’s perfect, except it’s missing a column. Luckily, you can use Select-Object along with the other CSV cmdlets to add a column.

In our example, let’s say that you have a CSV with two columns “ComputerName” and “IPAddress” and you want to add a column for “Port3389Open” to see if the port for RDP is open or not. It’s only a few lines of code from being done.

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26Jul/17

Use Test-NetConnection in PowerShell to See If A Port Is Open

The days of using ping.exe to see if a host is up or down are over. Your network probably shouldn’t allow ICMP to just fly around unaddressed, and your hosts probably shouldn’t return ICMP echo request (ping) messages either. So how do I know if a host is up or not?

Well, it involves knowing about what your host actually does. What ports are supposed to be open? Once you know that, you can use Test-NetConnection in PowerShell to check if the port is open and responding on the host you’re interested in.

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12Jul/17

Calculated Properties in PowerShell

Most of the time, a PowerShell cmdlet will return all the information you need to work with it later in the pipeline. Sometimes, though, there’s some assembly required. What I mean, is maybe the cmdlet returned the information you need, but not in the format you want, or you wish you had some property multiplied by some other property. Let’s explore.

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