Category Archives: active directory

03Apr/17

Quick Tip: Using Variables In ActiveDirectory Filters

If you work with the ActiveDirectory PowerShell module, you’ve probably used the -filter parameter to search for accounts or objects in Active Directory. You’ve probably wanted to use variables in those filters, too.

Say you have a command from something like an remote Exchange management shell, that returned an object that includes a username (called Alias in this example).

And let’s use that in an ActiveDirectory command. Ignoring the fact that you could find the account that has this username without using a filter, let’s see how you would use it in a filter.

You might try this.

But you’d get errors.

That’s because the filter can’t handle your variable that way. To use a variable in an ActiveDirectory cmdlet filter, you need to wrap the filter in curly braces.

And you get your results!

Pretty easy fix for a pretty silly issue.

11May/16

Easily Restore A Deleted Active Directory User

If you have a modern version of Active Directory, you have the opportunity to enable the Active Directory Recycle Bin. Once enabled, you have a chance to recover a deleted item once it has been removed from Active Directory.

Here’s a quick and easy script to recover a user based on their username.

On the first line, we’re getting the DistinguishedName for the deleted user. The DN changes when a user gets deleted because it’s in the Recycle Bin now. Where’s your deleted objects container? Well it’s easily found with the (Get-ADDomain).DeletedObjectsContainer part of line 1. All we’re doing is searching for AD objects in the deleted objects container whose username matches the one we’re looking for. We need to make sure the -IncludeDeletedObjects flag is set or nothing that’s deleted will be returned.

On the second line, we’re just using the Restore-ADObject cmdlet to restore the object at the DN we found above.

15Apr/16

Quick Script Share: Adding A Bunch Of Random Test Users To Active Directory

I recently had a need to add a bunch of random users to a specific OU in Active Directory to do some testing. I didn’t care what their names were, but, I wanted to be able to find all the users that belonged to each batch. Here’s the script I wrote to do this.

 

30Sep/15

Quick Tip: Which Of These Groups Are These Users Members Of?

Here’s a quick PowerShell function I put together that you might like to use or pick pieces from. The point of the function is to take a list of usernames and a list of groups and tell you which users are members of which groups, including through nested group membership.

As you can see, this function requires the ActiveDirectory PowerShell module and the function is named Test-IsGroupMember. It takes two parameters called Usernames and Groups. Both are “object” types so they could be an array or a string. I didn’t want to make overloaded versions of a script this simple so I took this shortcut. It’s expected that the values in Usernames and Groups will be SamAccountNames.

On Line 15, I start the work. For all of the groups you pass the function, it determines the recursive group members and extracts the SamAccountName attribute of the members returned. Then to the output stream, we write that the currently evaluated group has a number of members. On Line 19, we check to see if any of the usernames in the Usernames parameter are contained within the members of the group. I could have used a Compare-Object here but I didn’t. If the user is present in both arrays, we report back.

Here are some examples of how I like using this function.

Pretty flexible.

16Sep/15

Quick Script Share: Tell Me Everyone With Access To This Directory

Trying something new. Here’s a quick script I threw together to satisfy a request along the lines of “tell me all the users who have access to this directory”. It’s easy to see all the groups that have access just by right-clicking a directory and going to the Security tab but it’s a pain to get all the users who belong to those groups – especially if there are nested groups (within nested groups, within nested groups). Hence, this script. In addition to the ActiveDirectory PowerShell module, you of course need to be able to read the ACL on the directory you are interested in so use your admin account.

In this experimental post, I’m not going to break down the script, but instead, I’ve quickly commented in-line most of the tricky bits. I think it’s pretty straight forward, but, I wrote it. Let me know what you think.

 

02Sep/15

PowerShell Function To Get Time Since A User’s Password Was Last Changed

Here’s a small function I put in my PowerShell profile to tell me how long it’s been since an AD user’s password was last changed. You do know how to change your PowerShell profile, don’t you? Just type the following in a PowerShell prompt.

That will open your PowerShell profile in Notepad. You might be asked to create one if you don’t have anything there yet. Then just save that and next time you open PowerShell, whatever code you have in your profile will be executed. The code I’m putting in there right now is the definition for this function.

It’s pretty straight forward. My function is named Get-TimeSinceLastPWSet and takes one parameter, the username of the user we’re interested in. On Line 10, the actual work gets done. I’m making a new TimeSpan object assigned to $tsSinceLastPWSet which is the time between the user’s Passwordlastset AD attribute and the current date/time.

Since the function returns a timespan object, you can manipulate it like this to get more friendly output. (More info on Composite Formatting from MSDN. No PowerShell examples but it looks a lot like the C#.)

This will give you output that simply looks like “10 days, 12 hours” instead of the generic list formatted output you get when you write out a timespan object. I’ve actually made that the default behavior of the function I put in my personal profile because that’s more valuable to me.

Mine looks like this.

Just a small tweak. It returns that nice-to-look-at-string instead of the timespan object.

01Jun/15

How’s your Windows Server 2003 migration going? Does that question scare you?

Remember 2003? 2003 was a good year. Camera phones got popular, XBox took off, and I was a 14 year old in 9th grade. 2003 was also, obviously, the year that Microsoft released Windows Server 2003. Are you still running it? You shouldn’t be, but I bet lots of you are. That should scare you because in less than six weeks from the time of this post, on July 14, 2015, Microsoft is ending support for Windows Server 2003. If you’re not done your Windows Server 2003 migration to newer operating systems (Windows Server 2012 R2 is an excellent choice), or worse – not even started, you could face some very serious consequences. Let’s answer a few questions you might have about that.

What does it mean to be unsupported?

In case “end of support” isn’t clear, here’s some of the highlights from the long list of concerns outlined in this IDC white paper on why you should upgrade (pdf). There’s tons of reasons but these were the ones that resonated with me.

  • Elimination of security fixes.

Holy smokes. No more patches? For a second that almost sounds like a good thing, right? You’re probably tired of patching servers. But, think of the consequences and implications of that. No more patches is a terrible, scary, awful thing. If I need to tell you why, you may consider a different career than the one that brought you to my blog. If you ever want to pass another audit, you better be receiving and applying security fixes for all your products, especially ones as fundamental as your Windows OSes.

  • Lack of support.

Do you ever call Premier Support? Read Technet blogs or forums? Microsoft is shutting down support for Windows Server 2003 once it hits end of life. If you want help upgrading, you better get it now because after the end of life date, it might be a challenge to get.

Saying “I can put this off, I’m just going to buy extended support!” is the wrong attitude to have. First, you could buy an Egyptian pyramid for the amount of money that extended support is going to cost. Second, all you’re doing is delaying the inevitable. You have to do this. Do it now. It’s going to hurt more to put it off and do it later.

Okay, so there are some good reasons to get off Windows Server 2003 BUT are there any good reasons to get on Windows Server 2012 R2?

There’s tons. Windows Server 2012 R2 came out Q4 2013 and is the result of decades of learning, improvement, technological landscape shifting, development and a bunch of other buzz-verbs that all mean that it’s better. It’s better. Windows Server 2012 R2 is better than Windows Server 2003. Here’s just a few articles that support that statement.

If you look at all, you’ll find thousands more articles, slides, posts, tweets, talks and more on the benefits and features of Windows Server 2012 R2 over its predecessors.

Upgrading is so intimidating. I need help! Where can I get some?

Microsoft has your back on upgrading and migrating. There are lots of guides and articles on these topics but Microsoft has assembled, in my opinion, the best resource hub out there. Did you click that link? It takes you to the page with all the resources. Click one of these links to go to that page. I can’t overstate how important I think it is that you go to this page and read about the resources to help you migrate away from Windows Server 2003. All the links in this paragraph go to the same page. This is the page: https://www.microsoft.com/en-ca/server-cloud/products/windows-server-2003/default.aspx . It’s in your very best interest to go there and check out what’s there. Need the link one more time? Here.

Does it feel like I’m using this subsection of this post to direct you to Microsoft’s page with tons of resources you can use to make your migration possible, if not easy? It’s because I am. There’s tons of other resources out there, too, and they are a simple search away.

I get it. I want to upgrade. I’ve been pushing my organization to upgrade but I can’t seem to get permission. What can I do?

Surely I’ve convinced you of the many great reasons to migrate away from Windows Server 2003 to Windows Server 2012 R2. These arguments make sense for an IT Pro but maybe not for an executive, business people, or sometimes even to a developer. Here are a few of the common ways I see resistance and my suggestions to overcoming them. Of course, every organization’s politics are different and you may need to figure it out yourself.

  • We have App XYZ that only runs on Windows Server 2003. It’s crucial to our business. There’s no new version.

Respectfully, if this is the honest to goodness truth for your organization, you might be on the Blockbuster/Kodak path of sustainability. Read this Wikipedia article on the theory of Diffusion of Innovations. Take special note of chart that describes the different stages: Innovators, Early Adopters, Early Majority, Late Majority, and Laggards. You don’t have to adopt every new innovation that comes across your desk, but if your entire business is dependent on a technology or product that is about to reach end of life, you’re in trouble. You’re already in the laggard stage of the adoption process if you’re still not off Windows Server 2003. Just don’t fall off the chart completely – get migrating!

There comes a point where you’re not upgrading to gain an advantage, but to catch up to competitors who have already surpassed you.

  • App XYZ is crucial to our business. There’s a new version but we can’t afford the down time to upgrade.

This one is easier to work with than the last one. Attack this resistance from two sides. First, reiterate the importance of upgrading and all the bad things that will happen if you don’t. Second, and most importantly, find business reasons that make migrating to Windows Server 2012 R2 or the new version of App XYZ desirable to your specific stakeholders. Often with executives and business groups, it’s even more important to PULL them towards something new as it is to PUSH them away from something old.

To address the downtime concerns, put effort into making a plan that makes the downtime as short and painless as possible. Do a side-by-side migration. Do the cut over at 3 in the morning when your customers are all asleep. Find a way to make the downtime as tolerable as possible.

  • We don’t need new features. We accept the risk of running in an unsupported fashion. It’s just not worth our time to migrate.

This is a naive attitude, in my opinion. If you can’t find a creative way to improve anything within your organization with even one new feature in Windows Server 2012 R2, you’re not looking. A willingness to accept the risk of running unsupported demonstrates a lack of complete understanding of the risk involved with doing so. What would your customers say if you told them that your systems don’t receive security updates any more? If you get resistance like this, you need to find a reason to pull your stakeholders towards the newer technologies and make sure they’re clear on the risks of maintaining status quo.

Alright, I’m ready to take this on! Now how about a summary of some kind?

Glad you asked. If you take anything out of this post, make it these few things.

  1. Being unsupported is bad. Really bad. You don’t want to be unsupported for a lot of reasons including no more security patches.
  2. Windows Server 2012 R2 has a ton of new features that make it a great OS to migrate to.
  3. Microsoft has a lot of resources available to help you upgrade.
  4. Getting stakeholder permission for an upgrade is as much about selling the benefits of moving to a new system as much as it is about the disadvantages of staying on the old one.

Good luck and happy migrating!

27May/15

Quick Tip: Find All The Mail Enabled Groups A User Is A Member Of

Here’s a one-liner that will help you find all the mail enabled groups that a user is a member of. A little pre-requisite reading is this bit on group types to understand the difference between a security group and a distribution group: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc781446%28WS.10%29.aspx?f=255&MSPPError=-2147217396

Here’s the one-liner!

It might not be the epitome of efficiency but it works and served me well when I needed it to.

First, we’re running a Get-ADUser command on our interesting user and making sure to retrieve the MemberOf property in addition to the standard properties returned. Out of all of the returned properties, it turns out that MemberOf is the only one I’m interested in so I select only that property by wrapping the command in brackets and appending .MemberOf. Second, I’m piping all of the groups that the user is a member of into a foreach-object loop. For each of the objects returned, I’m performing a Get-ADGroup. I have to do this because I can’t necessarily tell which groups the user is a member of are mail enabled just from their name, I have to run the Get-ADGroup command to get more information. I’m piping these results into a where-object command where I select only the groups whose GroupCategory is equal to “Distribution” (see the pre-requisite reading above). Then I format the group names into a table.

I could have got every group in my Active Directory and searched for groups that contained my user as a member and were Distribution types, but in my situation, it was faster to only spot check the groups that the user was actually a member of. I have a lot of groups, you might not.