Tag Archives: beginner series

18Oct/17

Using PowerShell To Split A String Without Losing The Character You Split On

Last week, I wrote a post on the difference between .split() and -split in PowerShell. This week, we’re going to keep splitting strings, but we’re going to try to retain the character that we’re splitting on. Whether you use .split() or -split, when you split a string, it takes that character and essentially turns it into the separation of the two items on either side of it. But, what if I want to keep that character instead of losing it to the split?

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11Oct/17

What’s the difference between -split and .split() in PowerShell?

Here’s a question I see over and over and over again: “I have a string and I’m trying to split it on this part, but it’s jumbling it into a big mess. What’s going on?” Well, there’s splitting a string in PowerShell, and then there’s splitting a string in PowerShell. Confused? Let me explain.

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04Oct/17

PowerShell Rules For Format-Table And Format-List

In PowerShell, when outputting data to the console, it’s typically either organized into a table or a list. You can force output to take either of these forms using the Format-Table and the Format-List cmdlets, and people who write PowerShell cmdlets and modules can take special steps to make sure their output is formatted as they desire. But, when no developer has specifically asked for a formatted output (for example, by using a .format.ps1xml file to define how an object is formatted), how does PowerShell choose to display a table or a list?

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27Sep/17

The Difference Between Get-Member and .GetType() in PowerShell

Recently, I was helping someone in a forum who was trying to figure out what kind of object their command was returning. They knew about the standard cmdlets people suggest when you’re getting started (Get-HelpGet-Member, and Get-Command), but couldn’t figure out what was coming back from a specific command.

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09Aug/17

Add A Column To A CSV Using PowerShell

Say you have a CSV file full of awesome, super great, amazing information. It’s perfect, except it’s missing a column. Luckily, you can use Select-Object along with the other CSV cmdlets to add a column.

In our example, let’s say that you have a CSV with two columns “ComputerName” and “IPAddress” and you want to add a column for “Port3389Open” to see if the port for RDP is open or not. It’s only a few lines of code from being done.

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26Jul/17

Use Test-NetConnection in PowerShell to See If A Port Is Open

The days of using ping.exe to see if a host is up or down are over. Your network probably shouldn’t allow ICMP to just fly around unaddressed, and your hosts probably shouldn’t return ICMP echo request (ping) messages either. So how do I know if a host is up or not?

Well, it involves knowing about what your host actually does. What ports are supposed to be open? Once you know that, you can use Test-NetConnection in PowerShell to check if the port is open and responding on the host you’re interested in.

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