Tag Archives: powershell

09Aug/17

Add A Column To A CSV Using PowerShell

Say you have a CSV file full of awesome, super great, amazing information. It’s perfect, except it’s missing a column. Luckily, you can use Select-Object along with the other CSV cmdlets to add a column.

In our example, let’s say that you have a CSV with two columns “ComputerName” and “IPAddress” and you want to add a column for “Port3389Open” to see if the port for RDP is open or not. It’s only a few lines of code from being done.

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26Jul/17

Use Test-NetConnection in PowerShell to See If A Port Is Open

The days of using ping.exe to see if a host is up or down are over. Your network probably shouldn’t allow ICMP to just fly around unaddressed, and your hosts probably shouldn’t return ICMP echo request (ping) messages either. So how do I know if a host is up or not?

Well, it involves knowing about what your host actually does. What ports are supposed to be open? Once you know that, you can use Test-NetConnection in PowerShell to check if the port is open and responding on the host you’re interested in.

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14Jun/17

Can PowerShell Parameters Belong To Multiple Parameter Sets?

Say you’ve got a function that takes three parameters: Username, ComputerName and SessionName, but you don’t want someone to use ComputerName and SessionName at once. You decide to put them in separate parameter sets. Awesome, except you want Username to be a part of both parameter sets and it doesn’t look like you can specify more than one.

This will generate an error:

So how do you make a parameter a member of more than one parameter set? You need more [Parameter()] qualifiers.

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07Jun/17

Connecting to Exchange Online Using Multi-Factor Authentication via PowerShell

Using PowerShell to manage your Microsoft cloud services like Exchange Online is awesome. Using multi-factor authentication (MFA) is also awesome. For some reason, using the two together is not awesome. Many of the Microsoft docs on this seem to suggest you just perform all your administrative tasks from a shell that you launch entirely separately from a normal PowerShell console. I would rather be able to connect to Exchange Online using MFA via PowerShell through a normal console, or as part of another tool. Let me show you how.

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